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Scott Tipton on Crime

 

 


Harsher sentencing for "pill mill" operators.

Tipton signed Pill Mill Crackdown Act

    The Pill Mill Crackdown Act of 2011: Amends the Controlled Substances Act to:
  1. double the term of imprisonment and triple the fine for the prohibited distribution of a schedule II or schedule III controlled substance by the operator of a pill mill,
  2. increase the penalties for such operator distribution of a controlled substance to a person under age 21 from twice to thrice the maximum punishment or term of supervised release authorized, and
  3. exclude such operator distribution from the applicability of provisions authorizing an alternative fine of not more than twice the gross profits or other proceeds derived by a defendant from a drug offense.
      Expresses the sense of Congress that such prohibited operator distribution is a violation for which certain property is subject to forfeiture.
      • Requires the proceeds from disposition of such property to be used for controlled substance monitoring programs in the states and for block grants to states for community mental health services and for prevention and treatment of substance abuse.
      • Changes the classification of specified quantities of dihydrocodeinone from a schedule III to a schedule II controlled substance.
      Source: H.R.1065 11-HR1065 on Mar 14, 2011

      First step: reduce recidivism & mass incarceration.

      Tipton voted YEA First Step Act

      Congressional Summary:

      • TITLE I--RECIDIVISM REDUCTION: establish a risk and needs assessment system to evaluate the recidivism risk of prisoners; to guide housing assignments; and to reward participation in recidivism reduction programs.
      • TITLE II--BUREAU OF PRISONS SECURE FIREARMS STORAGE: allow federal correctional officers to securely store and carry concealed firearms on BOP premises outside the security perimeter of a prison.
      • TITLE III--RESTRAINTS ON PREGNANT PRISONERS PROHIBITED: limits the use of restraints on federal prisoners who are pregnant or in postpartum recovery.
      • TITLE IV--SENTENCING REFORM: reduces the enhanced mandatory minimum prison terms for certain repeat drug offenses.

      Opposing press release from Rep. Doug LaMalfa (R-CA-1):: The reform sentencing laws in this bill may compromise the safety of our communities. Criminals convicted of violent crimes would have the opportunity to achieve 'low risk' status and become eligible for early release. California already has similar laws in place--Propositions 47 and 57--which have hamstrung law enforcement and caused a significant uptick in crime.

      Supporting press release from Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY-10):: S. 756 establishes a new system to reduce the risk that [federal prisoners] will commit crimes once they are released. Critically, S. 756 would not only implement these reforms to our prison system, but it also takes a crucial first step toward addressing grave concerns about our sentencing laws, which have for years fed a national crisis of mass incarceration. The bill is a 'first step' that demonstrates that we can work together to make the system fairer in ways that will also reduce crime and victimization.

      Legislative outcome: Concurrence Passed Senate, 87-12-1, on Dec. 18, 2018; Concurrence Passed House 358-36-28, Dec. 20, 2018; President Trump signed, Dec. 21, 2018

      Source: Congressional vote 18-S756 on Dec 20, 2018

      Rated 54% by the NAPO, indicating a moderate stance on police issues.

      Tipton scores 54% by the NAPO on crime & police issues

      Ratings by the National Association of Police Organizations indicate support or opposition to issues of importance to police and crime. The organization's self-description: "The National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO) is a coalition of police units and associations from across the United States. NAPO was organized for the purpose of advancing the interests of America's law enforcement officers through legislative advocacy, political action, and education.

      "Increasingly, the rights and interests of law enforcement officers have been the subject of legislative, executive, and judicial action in the nationís capital. NAPO works to influence the course of national affairs where law enforcement interests are concerned. The following list includes examples of NAPOís accomplishments:

      • Enactment of the Fair Sentencing Act
      • Enactment of the National AMBER Alert Act
      • Enactment of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act
      • Enactment of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act
      • Enactment of the Law Enforcement Officers' Safety Act (Right to Carry Legislation)

      VoteMatch scoring for the NAPO ratings is as follows:

      • 0%-50%: soft on crime and police issues;
      • 50%-75%: mixed record on crime and police issues;
      • 75%-100%: tough on crime and police issues.
      Source: NAPO ratings on Congress and politicians 2014_NAPO on Dec 31, 2014

      2021-22 Governor, House and Senate candidates on Crime: Scott Tipton on other issues:
      CO Gubernatorial:
      Bob Beauprez
      Cary Kennedy
      Cynthia Coffman
      Donna Lynne
      Doug Robinson
      Ed Perlmutter
      George Brauchler
      Greg Lopez
      Heidi Ganahl
      Jared Polis
      John Hickenlooper
      Matthew Hess
      Michael Bennet
      Mike Johnston
      Steve Barlock
      Tom Tancredo
      Victor Mitchell
      Walker Stapleton
      CO Senatorial:
      Alice Madden
      Andrew Romanoff
      Angela Williams
      Cory Gardner
      Dan Baer
      Darryl Glenn
      Ellen Burnes
      John Hickenlooper
      John Walsh
      Jon Keyser
      Michael Bennet
      Mike Johnston
      Peg Littleton
      Ryan Frazier
      Tim Neville
      Republican Freshman class of 2021:
      AL-1: Jerry Carl(R)
      AL-2: Barry Moore(R)
      CA-8: Jay Obernolte(R)
      CA-50: Darrell Issa(R)
      CO-3: Lauren Boebert(R)
      FL-3: Kat Cammack(R)
      FL-15: Scott Franklin(R)
      FL-19: Byron Donalds(R)
      GA-9: Andrew Clyde(R)
      GA-14: Marjorie Taylor Greene(R)
      IA-2: Mariannette Miller-Meeks(R)
      IA-4: Randy Feenstra(R)
      IL-15: Mary Miller(R)
      IN-5: Victoria Spartz(R)
      KS-1: Tracey Mann(R)
      KS-2: Jake LaTurner(R)
      LA-5: Luke Letlow(R)
      MI-3: Peter Meijer(R)
      MI-10: Lisa McClain(R)
      MT-0: Matt Rosendale(R)
      NC-11: Madison Cawthorn(R)
      NM-3: Teresa Leger Fernandez(D)
      NY-2: Andrew Garbarino(R)
      NY-22: Claudia Tenney(R)
      OR-2: Cliff Bentz(R)
      PR-0: Jenniffer Gonzalez-Colon(R)
      TN-1: Diana Harshbarger(R)
      TX-4: Pat Fallon(R)
      TX-11: August Pfluger(R)
      TX-13: Ronny Jackson(R)
      TX-17: Pete Sessions(R)
      TX-22: Troy Nehls(R)
      TX-23: Tony Gonzales(R)
      TX-24: Beth Van Duyne(R)
      UT-1: Blake Moore(R)
      VA-5: Bob Good(R)
      WI-5: Scott Fitzgerald(R)
      Incoming Democratic Freshman class of 2021:
      CA-53: Sara Jacobs(D)
      GA-5: Nikema Williams(D)
      GA-7: Carolyn Bourdeaux(D)
      HI-2: Kai Kahele(D)
      IL-3: Marie Newman(D)
      IN-1: Frank Mrvan(D)
      MA-4: Jake Auchincloss(D)
      MO-1: Cori Bush(D)
      NC-2: Deborah Ross(D)
      NC-6: Kathy Manning(D)
      NY-15: Ritchie Torres(D)
      NY-16: Jamaal Bowman(D)
      NY-17: Mondaire Jones(D)
      WA-10: Marilyn Strickland(D)

      Republican takeovers as of 2021:
      CA-21: David Valadao(R) defeated T.J. Cox(D)
      CA-39: Young Kim(R) defeated Gil Cisneros(D)
      CA-48: Michelle Steel(R) defeated Harley Rouda(D)
      FL-26: Carlos Gimenez(R) defeated Debbie Mucarsel-Powell(D)
      FL-27: Maria Elvira Salazar(R) defeated Donna Shalala(D)
      IA-1: Ashley Hinson(R) defeated Abby Finkenauer(D)
      MN-7: Michelle Fischbach(R) defeated Collin Peterson(D)
      NM-2: Yvette Herrell(R) defeated Xochitl Small(D)
      NY-11: Nicole Malliotakis(R) defeated Max Rose(D)
      OK-5: Stephanie Bice(R) defeated Kendra Horn(D)
      SC-1: Nancy Mace(R) defeated Joe Cunningham(D)
      UT-4: Burgess Owens(R) defeated Ben McAdams(D)

      Special Elections 2021-2022:
      CA-22: replacing Devin Nunes (R, SPEL summer 2022)
      FL-20: replacing Alcee Hastings (D, SPEL Jan. 2022)
      LA-2: Troy Carter (R, April 2021)
      LA-5: Julia Letlow (R, March 2021)
      NM-1: Melanie Stansbury (D, June 2021)
      OH-11: Shontel Brown (D, Nov. 2021)
      OH-15: Mike Carey (R, Nov. 2021)
      TX-6: Jake Ellzey (R, July 2021)
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      Page last updated: Jun 08, 2022; copyright 1999-2022 Jesse Gordon and OnTheIssues.org